Podcasts

T he slider below includes a number of  interviews that Coy has been
fortunate to have during his 15-plus years in radio.

 

 

 

 

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Coy accepted an invitation to interview President Barack Obama during his re-election campaign in September 2012. The White House called the radio station in Charlottesville on Friday afternoon, September 21, and the conversation was recorded for a later broadcast. Coy began the interview by asking President Obama to respond to some recent remarks his Republican opponent Governor Mitt Romney had made.

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During Barack Obama’s first campaign for the Presidency in 2008, Coy accepted an invitation to meet with the candidate in a sit-down, one-on-one interview. Coy and President Obama met to talk in a classroom at John Tyler Community College in Chester, Virginia on the morning of August 21, 2008. Coy asked about campaign politics as well as the effects Barack Obama’s mother’s work as an anthropologist may have had on his view of the world. This interview was particularly significant because Coy Barefoot was the only member of the media in 2008 to ask candidate Obama about the epidemic of autism in America.

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Oxford University’s Richard Dawkins, an evolutionary biologist and internationally acclaimed best-selling author, joined Coy in studio on a trip to Charlottesville in the fall of 2011. They discussed Professors Dawkins’ most recent book The Magic of Reality, in addition to his previous observations regarding religious belief. Later, when asked if Barefoot was really Coy’s last name, Dawkins wrote, “Well, I think it was coincidence (it really is his name) but he was wearing no shoes or socks during the interview. Very good interviewer.”

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On Memorial Day 2006 a car bomb with an estimated 500 pounds worth of explosives detonated on a Baghdad street. The blast sent shards of fiery metal and glass in all directions. Four men were killed, and CBS News Reporter Kimberly Dozier lay in a pool of her own blood fighting for her life. Just over two years later, after a number of surgeries and endless months of painful physical therapy, Kimberly Dozier was Coy’s guest on “Charlottesville—Right Now!” They discussed her memories of the tragic bombing that had put her at the center of an international story. Kimberly’s inspiring and candid account of the bombing and its aftermath is the subject of her book, Breathing the Fire, which is now available in paperback. Coy and Kimberly have been friends for over 20 years, since their years in graduate school at the University of Virginia.

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Prior to his appearance at the 2010 Virginia Film Festival, Coy spoke with acclaimed director and film historian Peter Bogdanovich. Bogdanovich spoke candidly about working with Ryan and Tatum O’Neal on Paper Moon and shared the significance of The Last Picture Show to his career. He also bemoaned the “fractured” story-telling in today’s films that too often showcases bad writing, limited imagination, and “show-offy” directors. Bogdanovich explained how the “B” movies of the past are now the “A” movies and more often than not, the “A” movies don’t get made anymore.

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In 2008 Coy had the great fortune to interview best-selling author Annette Gordon-Reed about her new book The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family. Gordon-Reed shared some fascinating findings from her many years of research into the story of Sally Hemings and her children. The book spans numerous generations of the Hemings family, both before and after their time as members of the enslaved community at Monticello. Gordon-Reed’s impressive book went on to win sixteen awards, including the Pulitzer Prize for History in 2009.

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Coy recorded this conversation with award-winning and multiple-best-selling author John Grisham at his office in Charlottesville in 2008, shortly before the release of Grisham’s 21st novel, The Associate. The celebrated author discussed his writing process, authors and books he particularly enjoys, and some of the favorite characters he has created. A former member of the Mississippi State House of Representatives, Grisham also talked about his long-time interest in politics and shared some observations on politics in America today. (photo by Jen Fariello)

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Coy enjoyed a fascinating conversation with biological anthropologist and best-selling author Helen Fisher. They discussed her book, Why Him, Why Her? and the nature of love and relationships. Helen also shared some shocking findings from her research about the side-effects of anti-depressants on human relationships.

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Nobel Prize-winning southern novelist William Faulkner was the University of Virginia’s first writer-in-residence in the late 1950s, prior to his death in 1962. During his time in Charlottesville, Faulkner delivered a number of public lectures— most of which were recorded on reel-to-reel tapes. In 2010 the University unveiled an impressive online archive— Faulkner at Virginia— that made more than 28 hours worth of Faulkner recordings available to the wider public for the first time. Faulkner expert and UVa professor Stephen Railton was the writer, editor, and director behind the creation of the website. Railton joined Coy in studio to explore Faulkner’s work and listen to a number of these historic recordings on the air. (photo by Ralph Thompson)

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Beginning in the late 1950s, the medical research of William Masters and Virginia Johnson was a revolutionary turning point in our understanding of sex. Award-winning and investigative journalist Thomas Maier went behind the scenes to uncover the true and shocking story about Masters and Johnson. Coy welcomed Maier to the program to talk about his book Masters of Sex: The Life and Times of William Masters and Virginia Johnson, the Couple Who Taught America How to Love. In August 2011, the Showtime Network announced that it had launched production of a new one-hour drama series “Masters of Sex” based on Maier’s book.

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Award-winning and best-selling author Sam Harris is among the most intelligent, insightful and yet controversial writers in the world today. His critique of religious faith has sparked countless debates and put him at the center of what has been called a “New Atheism.”  Harris joined Coy on the program for an extended conversation about his first two books, End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason and Letter to a Christian Nation. Harris admits it is the utter “strangeness” of the situation that perplexes him most: “It’s as if we were living in a world where millions of people were organizing their lives around the plays of Shakespeare and fighting wars over rival interpretations of these plays. We are being deranged by ancient literature. You wouldn’t believe it were possible, but for the fact that it is actually occurring.”

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